Posts Tagged ‘Short (finance)’

Home sales fall, despite uptick in 1st-time buyers

First-time homebuyers rise but not enough to lift the weak housing market

ap

Derek Kravitz, AP Real Estate Writer, On Thursday May 19, 2011, 3:56 pm EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer people purchased previously occupied homes in April, a troubling sign that the weak housing market remains a drag on the economy.

Sales fell 0.8 percent in April to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.05 million units, the National Association of Realtors said Thursday. That’s far below the 6 million homes a year that economists say represents a healthy market.

Purchases made by first-time homebuyers did increase but not nearly enough to signal a housing recovery is on the way. First-time buyers are critical because they typically improve their properties and invest in their communities, a combination that helps home values rise.

Foreclosures, on the other hand, force prices down. They represented more than a third of all sales in April and more are expected in the months ahead.

Since the housing boom went bust, sales have fallen in four of the past five years and hit a 13-year low last year. Declining home prices and low mortgage rates haven’t been enough to boost sales this year.

Some who want to buy can’t, mostly because banks have tightened lending requirements and are insisting on larger down payments. Many buyers who can qualify for loans are holding off. They are worried that home prices have yet to bottom out.

Economists say it could be years before the housing market fully recovers.

A growing problem is that some sales that are under contract are falling apart. A separate survey from the trade group found 11 percent of Realtors said a contract was canceled because an appraisal came in below the negotiated price. And 14 percent said a contract was renegotiated to a lower price because of a low appraisal.

The median sales price in April was $163,700. That’s down 5 percent from the same month one year ago. The median price of a new home is now nearly 31 percent higher than the median price for a previously occupied home — or twice the normal markup.

The gap is largely because of the flood of foreclosures or short sales — when the lender accepts less than what is owed on the mortgage. Those sales are forcing down prices.

Sales of homes at risk of foreclosure fell in April. But they still made up 37 percent of all purchases. And a large number of pending foreclosures are backlogged in the courts or held up by state and federal probes into troubled foreclosure practices by lenders.

A record 1 million homes were lost to foreclosures last year and foreclosure tracker RealtyTrac Inc. expects 1.2 million more will be lost this year.

Another problem for the housing market is the glut of unsold homes. In April, the supply rose to nearly 3.9 million. At last month’s sales pace, it would take more than 9 months to clear those homes. Analysts say a healthy supply can be cleared in six months.

The increase in unsold inventory “should continue to weigh on prices,” said Dan Greenhaus, chief economic strategist at Miller Tabak + Co.

The situation is much worse when taking into account the “shadow inventory” of homes, economists say. These are homes that are in the early stages of the foreclosure process but, because of backlogged courts or the government probes, have not hit the market for re-sale.

The Mortgage Bankers Association said Monday that about 8.3 percent of homeowners missed at least one mortgage payment in the January-March quarter when adjusted for seasonal factors. That’s up 0.7 percent from the previous quarter.

Sales fell across most regions of the country. In April, sales declined 7.5 percent in the Northeast, 1.6 percent in the West and 1 percent in the South. But they rose 5.7 percent in the Midwest.

Article found at: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Home-sales-fall-despite-apf-1672163469.html?x=0

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Arizona and Colorado Home Foreclosures Raised 10 Percent in April

By ForeclosureWarehouse.com
Published: Tuesday, Apr. 26, 2011 – 4:15 am

NEW YORK, April 26, 2011 — /PRNewswire/ — ForeclosureWarehouse.com recently reported that in April, the top five states with more foreclosure opportunities were California, Florida, Colorado, Arizona, and Georgia. From March to April, only Florida saw a decrease at -12.07 percent in foreclosures. California foreclosures increased 4.95 percent, Colorado was up 13.98 percent, Arizona was up 11.96 percent, and Georgia was up 7.22 percent.

Borrowers lost 1.67 million homes in 2010 as some 27 percent of U.S. mortgage holders were underwater (owed more than their house was worth) by the end of 2010. 2.9 million homes received foreclosure filings in 2010, and there would have been more if not for court interference after it was discovered that some lenders hired inexperienced people to process foreclosures without following procedures and verification of facts (robo-signing).

More than 1.8 million homes are projected to be taken this year in foreclosures, short sales and voluntary dispossessions, paving the way for astute investors to purchase homes in desirable areas for a steep discount on their actual value.

Housing will remain weak in the next few months amid the high number of houses in foreclosure. Demand for homes is likely to remain quiet as unemployment of almost 9 percent continues to plague the labor market and credit market conditions remain firm.

The outlook of more foreclosures looming, declining prices of excellent homes in prime neighborhoods, and an unemployment rate expected to average about 8.7 percent this year means a housing recovery may take years to evolve. Foreclosure filings will climb about 20 percent, reaching a peak for the housing crisis in 2011.

Top 5 states with more foreclosures in April:  
State Number of properties  
California 10,388  
Florida 8,224  
Colorado 7,779  
Arizona 5,038  
Georgia 3,833  
   

 

Even with all the government intervention and assistance efforts, the U.S. housing market remains under pressure from a poor employment outlook and oversupply of houses. The national political climate for budget tightening means homeowner assistance programs will lose support and no new programs will be started.

Recent rumblings in the markets about inflation do not seem to affect the housing industry. There is a glut of distressed properties on the market. The average rate on a 30-year fixed loan increased to 4.98 percent the week ended April 8; still an excellent rate for purchasing a home.

This is all good news for the investor or home buyer. This is an ideal time to buy a home if an individual is in a good position to purchase a house; the buyer has job security, has a credit score high enough to be approved for a loan, has enough money for a down payment (usually 20 percent), and is ready to establish roots in a community, for example.

A large part of the buyers’ market will continue to be short sales and foreclosure sales as bargain-hunting investors and borrowers continue to find value in short sale and foreclosed properties, choosing these properties over traditional sales.

Lenders will increase the number of short sale and foreclosures properties they release to the market in anticipation of the settlement of the government “robo-signing” lawsuit furthering the opportunities for buyers to purchase at substantial price discounts.

After the government receives the $25 billion settlement from the financial institutions in trouble for the robo-signing debacle, there will not be nearly enough for the estimated $800 billion necessary to support all the underwater mortgages in the U.S.

The rising price of gasoline and other factors may prevent many potential buyers from venturing into the housing market. Oversupply together with weak demand for homes will likely keep housing prices low and declining for the remainder of 2011.

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SOURCE ForeclosureWarehouse.com

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Fewer than three of five short sales close in California

C.A.R. released the results of a statewide survey on short sales and the challenges REALTORS® face in working with lenders and servicers. 

The most frequent problems REALTORS® cited in working with lenders and servicers during the short sale process include unresponsiveness, onerous procedures, and long processing delays.  The survey also found that fewer than three of five short sales close in California, illustrating the complexity and difficulty of navigating lenders’ and servicers’ short sale procedures. 

“The lack of standardization, long approval process, and lack of lender approvals are hampering what should be a 45-day short sale process,” said C.A.R. President Beth L. Peerce.  “Instead we’re hearing the typical response time for lenders is at least 60 days, and in many instances, their response time exceeds 6 months.”

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Benefits of Short Sales

Short sales are famous for its low home prices and it is also offers benefits to sellers, lenders and buyers as well. A short sale is where the homeowner owes more than his or her mortgage. However, the lenders must approve the sale amount and agree to cover the expenses the seller cannot obviously pay.

A combination of regular property transaction and a foreclosure by the bank makes up the short sales. The homeowner who cannot comply anymore with the mortgage will make an agreement with the lender that instead of foreclosing the property, the property will be put up for sale. Once the property is bought, the seller will then pay the money to the lender which will benefit the seller because he or she doesn’t need to worry anymore when it comes to paying the loan the lender gave him or her.

Short sales benefit the buyers because of the cost of the property. It is known that when a property is up for a short sale it is being sold at a very low price so the seller can pay off the loan immediately. This is to avoid a foreclosure which may cause hassle to the seller and the lender as well and it will be even more difficult to find a buyer because the prices will be a bit higher.

If you’re looking for a home, then you probably need to look for homes that are up for short sales especially if you need an immediate home and you can’t stand any more waiting for a property to be on sale. There is lesser competition in a short sale which will likely give you the opportunity to score up a home in a fast way.

Short sales benefit the three people involved in the particular sale; the lender will be paid off in a fast way, the seller will be able to pay the loan immediately and the buyer will get a home in a fast way. However, it is best that you do a walk-through when you are buying a short sale home because some of these homes have damages. However, there are homes that are up in a short sale that are still in very good condition.

So, if you want to score a home in a fast way, you should look for short sales around the area and probably you can seek help from a real estate agent.

Written by Carol Pefley

www.carolpefley.com

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